Thursday, April 11, 2013

"Detection of Mycotoxins in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome"-Study Results


I've landed temporarily about 2 hours east of where I used to live. I'll post an update soon. In the meantime here's an interesting article.

That they found mycotoxins in 93% of ME/CFS patients is significant and can point towards another avenue to pursue in terms of treatment. Thirty percent have more than one mycotoxin present in urine.


Detection of Mycotoxins in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome



Abstract: Over the past 20 years, exposure to mycotoxin producing mold has been recognized as a significant health risk. Scientific literature has demonstrated mycotoxins as possible causes of human disease in water-damaged buildings (WDB). This study was conducted to determine if selected mycotoxins could be identified in human urine from patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Patients (n = 112) with a prior diagnosis of CFS were evaluated for mold exposure and the presence of mycotoxins in their urine. Urine was tested for aflatoxins (AT), ochratoxin A (OTA) and macrocyclic trichothecenes (MT) using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA). Urine specimens from 104 of 112 patients (93%) were positive for at least one mycotoxin (one in the equivocal range). Almost 30% of the cases had more than one mycotoxin present. OTA was the most prevalent mycotoxin detected (83%) with MT as the next most common (44%). Exposure histories indicated current and/or past exposure to WDB in over 90% of cases. Environmental testing was performed in the WDB from a subset of these patients. This testing revealed the presence of potentially mycotoxin producing mold species and mycotoxins in the environment of the WDB. Prior testing in a healthy control population with no history of exposure to a WDB or moldy environment (n = 55) by the same laboratory, utilizing the same methods, revealed no positive cases at the limits of detection.




Brewer JH, Thrasher JD, Straus DC, Madison RA, Hooper D. Detection of Mycotoxins in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Toxins. 2013; 5(4):605-617.

2 comments:

ErikMoldWarrior said...

"By the way, there is no clinical difference between CIRS due to water damaged buildings and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. We trade patients. I get his (Dr Ritchie Shoemaker's) patients that he can’t seem to fix with mold, and he gets my patients that I can’t seem to fix because maybe they have mold. So we keep trading patients, and we can’t tell the difference between them."
-Dr Paul Cheney

http://cfspatientadvocate.blogspot.com/

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